Sterling Silver Ring Settings

Sterling Silver Ring Settings

A different alloy of sterling silver, called argentium, is also created with 92.5 percent silver. Argentium, however, replaces a small amount of the copper with a metal called germanium. This special alloy is useful in applications that have exposure to high temperature since it reduces the firescale that forms in normal sterling silver. It also has even higher tarnish resistance than ordinary sterling silver.

In 2007 a U.S. patent issued for an alloy of sterling silver with enhanced tarnish resistance and exceptional hardness. Like most sterling silver, this alloy contains 92.5 percent silver. But it only has about 5.25 percent copper. The remainder is made of zinc, tin, lithium, silicon, germanium and boron. Sterling silver of 92.5 percent purity is also alloyed with platinum in some artistic settings to modify appearance, make it harder and increase tarnish resistance.

950 Silver Ring Setting

Sterling Silver Ring Settings

Silver of 95 percent purity is relatively rare because it is a nonstandard alloy. Technically it is not fine silver because it falls considerably below 99.9 percent fineness. This means it is sterling silver, but more pure than most sterling silver. 950 silver will be softer than most sterling silver and will tarnish more easily. This means it is unlikely to be used in most industrial applications. Most 950 silver is used for jewelry.

Quality Ring Settings

Sterling Silver Ring Settings

To see the good quality of the setting on your ring on the gemstone is the metal should bend over to hold the loft of the stone. If it doesn’t do it, that means your gemstone is glued in. If the gemstone is glued in, especially on a ring, which you have wet while you wash your hands. Sometimes different temperatures at one point the glue will not be strong enough to hold the stone and you lose the stone. If you look at the gemstone, they are somehow, they have a girdle, that’s the widest and then they bend a little bit. So, the setting, no matter if it’s bezel or prongs, they always bend over the gemstone.

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